Understanding those pesky coaches...

CCScottMitchell

Scott Mitchell


North Country CC
Enrollment & Financial Aid Counselor, Men's Assistant Basketball Coach
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How many of you work with your athletic department on a daily basis? Or should I say, how many times a day do your athletic coaches call you about a prospective student athlete?

Our coaches call five or six times a day asking about this person or that person, and if your office is in the same boat, I would imagine this annoys many of you. I work in admissions and athletics; therefore I would like to give you a little insight to help you out with your frustration when a coach calls or stops in the office all the time.

In my eyes, there is a big difference between recruiting for admissions and recruiting for athletics. While recruiting for enrollment, admissions professionals interact with their prospective students on much more of a professional level. Admissions professionals communicate with prospective students through email, over the phone, at college fairs (for a few minutes), high school visits (for another couple minutes), and during their campus visit. The relationship with a prospective student never really reaches a personal level.

In contrast, when a college coach is recruiting a prospective student-athlete it becomes much more personal. For example, coaches attend many games, make many recruiting phone calls, and dedicate much of their own time and effort trying to land a prospective student-athlete. Coaches form a personal relationship with not only the prospective student-athlete, but also with their family.

When a coach invests so much of their personal time and feelings into recruiting these prospective student-athletes the bond between them is very strong. This makes a unique relationship between the prospective student-athlete and the coach. Since the bond is so strong, coaches quickly become mentors and gain trust between them and the prospective student-athlete.

This is why coaches are constantly calling you, or should I say aggravating you all the time. Hopefully, this will help relieve some stress the next time one of your fellow coaches calls you six times in one day.